Posts Tagged: Dr. Susan Anderson

Women’s History Month: Mary Easton Sibley

Mary Easton Sibley age 68

March is National Women’s History Month. Today, I’m celebrating the legacy of women in American History with a look at educator, Mary Easton Sibley. (more…)

Doc Susie & Book Giveaway

Doc Susie bag

You never know who you might meet in Cripple Creek, Colorado!

Mona with Hedy Boyce as Doc Susie

While I was in Cripple Creek in August to participate in the Gold Camp Days and Western Literature Festival, I made Wyatt Earp’s acquaintance through a program presented by his grandson, Wyatt Earp.

Then during a book signing at the Cripple Creek District Museum, I met Doc Susie, played by Hedy Boyce.

One thing is for certain, there’s never a dull moment in Cripple Creek. Even if after a full day of museum hopping and historical exploration, you’ve tuck yourself into your peaceful room at Carr Manor. The historic Cripple Creek High School repurposed as a lovely Bed & Breakfast is far too rich in history to be dull.

The Bride Wore Blue (2)What fun it was to meet Hedy and chat with her about Doc Susie, the real life woman I feature as a fictional secondary character in The Bride Wore Blue, Book 3 in my Sinclair Sisters of Cripple Creek Series.

I was excited when Hedy agreed to an interview, to share a bit about one of her favorite historical Cripple Creek characters–Dr. Susan Anderson. (more…)

A Cripple Creek Tribute

Mt Pisgah Cemetary PicMonk

Research trips for my historical fiction takes me to museums, libraries, historical societies, archives . . . and old cemeteries. Like the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery in Cripple Creek, Colorado.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Veterans Memorial Section

Established in 1892, the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery is one of Cripple Creek’s oldest sites. Mt. Pisgah remains a natural setting with native plants and wildflowers. Depending upon the time of year, you might find wild iris, goldenrod, Indian paintbrush, bluebells, even raspberries and strawberries in mid-summer.

Why visit cemeteries as part of my research?

1. To find historically accurate names.

2. To discover ethnic names for that time and place.

3. To find common nicknames.

4. To learn about the average lifespan.

5. To discover typical causes of death.

6. To learn the language and syntax used.

7. To feel immersed in history.

The Sinclair Sisters of Cripple Creek Series

The Sinclair Sisters of Cripple Creek Series

In my four Sinclair Sisters of Cripple Creek books, I used real-life women who lived in Cripple Creek in the late 1890’s, my time period for the series. Both of the historical women I featured in The Bride Wore Blue are buried atop Mt. Pisgah.

Have you visited old cemeteries? Which ones have you visited, and why?

© 2013 Mona Hodgson, Author and Speaker

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